Venturing Sea Scout Recognition

Venturing is a flexible program, and the awards program is designed to help all Venturers, no matter what their crew specialty, to grow and develop.

The four levels of awards are:

  1. VENTURING AWARD 
    The first step in any journey is the courage to begin. At this level, the new crew member makes a commitment to join and move forward into the experience of Venturing.
    • Award Focus: Joining
      • Commitment to a new experience
      • BSA training on personal safety
  2. DISCOVERY AWARD 
    The adventure of participating with the crew unfolds, and each Venturer begins to discover his or her interests and talents. As the Discovery Award recipients develop new skills and competencies, their eyes are opened, and the world expands for them.
    • Award Focus: Participation
      • Small-group management skills training
      • Earn first-aid and CPR certifications
      • Goal-setting training
      • Time-management training
      • Minimum of 24 hours of service
      • Establish and achieve at least one personal goal, including peer and advisor review
  3. PATHFINDER AWARD 
    The Venturer’s capabilities and skills expand, and with them come increased responsibility for defining their own way forward in life, service to others, and formal planning and leadership of the crew toward its goals.
    • Award Focus: Leadership
      •  Project management training
      • Plan and lead at least one crew activity of one day or longer
      • Serve in elected leadership position for six months or more
      • Experiential training in conflict resolution, communications, group dynamics, cooperation, and ethical controversies
      • Plan and lead activity to enhance crew sustainability
      • Plan and participate in service of 36 hours or more
      • Establish and achieve two personal goals
  4. SUMMIT AWARD 
    The highest award of Venturing, the Summit Award, goes to those Venturers who have matured in their personal direction, skills, and life competencies, and who have accepted the responsibility to mentor others and serve their communities in a lasting way.
    • Award Focus: Mentoring
      • Mentoring and coaching skills training
      • Mentor a crew member in planning and leadership of crew activity
      • Serve in elected leadership position for six months
      • Lead the delivery of small-group management skills and training
      • Complete advanced leadership training
      • Plan, develop, and give leadership to community service project
      • Complete goal development and planning for all realms of personal growth
      • Create personal code of conduct for review by peers and adult advisors
      • Lead and guide ethical controversy and conflict resolution discussion with crew

Sea Scouting Quartermaster Award

 

The Quartermaster Award, which stands for excellence, goes to the young adult who attains the highest rank in Sea Scouts. The award is a reminder that as a ship needs a rudder, a compass, and a moving force to reach its destination, so an individual must be physically strong, mentally awake, and morally straight to achieve worthwhile goals in life. It represents fulfillment. It results from a young adult's determination to reach goals that he or she has set and achieved in spite of difficulties along the way.

The award is rich in symbolism. The blue ribbon stands for loyalty and country. The compass suggests the importance of carefully chosen direction in life. The wheel reminds us that we are the guide of our own future and that we must persevere with self-discipline. The Scout badge, the emblem of purposeful brotherhood, has challenged and strengthened the lives of more than 40 million men. It shows Sea Scouting as an important part of the Scouting tradition. The anchor reminds us that a truly worthy life must be anchored in duty to God.

This badge of color, beauty, and symbolism, but most of all, challenge, awaits every Sea Scout who has the determination to achieve excellence.

Requirements

  • Ideals. Must lead a discussion on the ideals stated in the Sea Promise and prepare a written analysis of one aspect of the ship’s program.
  • Membership. Attend at least 75 percent of ship meetings and activities for 18 months. Present a talk on Sea Scouts.
  • Leadership. Conduct a Quartermaster Project and serve as an elected officer or as activity chair for three major events.  Command a 40 hour Quartermaster Cruise.
  • Special Skills. Complete the 11 special skills required for Quartermaster, which include:

  • Swimming.
  • Safety
  • Marlinespike Seamanship
  • Boat Handling
  • Anchoring
  • Navigation Rules
  • Piloting
  • Weather
  • Environment
  • Electives. Complete four of the following electives: sailing, engine, radio, boat maintenance, electricity, navigation, drill, piloting, rigging, yacht racing crew.